This information has been prepared to help you care for your child at home.  However, recovery times will vary between individual children.

Following these guidelines will help reduce the risk of any bleeding and infection for your child and hopefully ensure a trouble free recovery.

For the first 10 days following surgery your child should be in the care of a responsible adult as bleeding may occur.

A follow-up appointment is not usually necessary unless your child has also had grommets inserted.

Does my child need rest?

To reduce the risk of bleeding we suggest your child rests for the next 2 – 3 days.

  • General anaesthetics can wear off slowly, making children feel dizzy
  • Please watch your child carefully for the first 48 hours at home and do not let him/her climb stairs alone.
  • After 2- 3 days of resting he/she should feel able, gradually, to return to normal activity.
  • Your child will be more comfortable in a smoke free room.

What can my child eat and drink?

By the time your child is ready to go home, he or she should have managed a drink and a light diet. You may continue a light diet at home. Encourage your child to have frequent drinks.

If your child should vomit, you should give small amounts of water or weak squash (little and often) and gradually reintroduce a light diet as tolerated. If vomiting is excessive or continues you should contact your GP or your local Emergency Department.

If the vomit contains fresh or old blood seek medical advice using the telephone numbers given below.

When can my child blow his/her nose?

To prevent bleeding we suggest your child does not blow his or her nose for 3 – 4 days

You could encourage your child to breathe through the nose once completely better.

For how long will my child have discomfort and how should I deal with it?

Your child may feel some discomfort for between 1 – 3 days

We suggest your child may need paracetamol and ibuprofen for the first 2 days, even if he/she appears to have no pain.  These should be taken as needed to control pain and prevent a raised temperature. You can give up to the maximum dose for both but do not exceed this. Please refer to the instructions on the bottle.

REMEMBER!! NEVER TO EXCEED THE STATED DOSE

Can my child have friends to play?

During the first few days after the operation your child has an increased risk of picking up infection. Therefore, apart from immediate family, it is best not to have a lot of visitors, especially children, and to avoid crowded places.

When can my child return to school?

Most children feel well enough to return to school after 10 days when the risk of bleeding has passed.  You need to check the amount of time children need to be off sick from school – you may need to take time off work or plan child care. Get a sick certificate from you GP – ask the nurse to give you a copy of the GP letter so you can claim a certificate.

Can my child play sports?

To prevent bleeding: football, contact sports, games, PE, dancing, newspaper rounds, etc. are best avoided for 2 weeks.

Problems which may occur

Nose bleed

Excess bleeding from the nose always require medical attention.

Small amounts of blood stained secretions does not require immediate attention. Observe and seek medical advice if this continues.

For nose bleeds following adenoidectomy, sit your child up, apply ice to the nose and keep rested and quiet.

Raised temperature

This often occurs within the first 48 hours following adenoidectomy. Remove outer clothing.

Continue to give Paracetamol four times daily. Encourage your child to rest and give plenty to drink.

Vomiting

If your child should vomit, you should give small amounts of water or weak squash (little and often) and gradually reintroduce a light diet as tolerated. If vomiting is excessive, continues or contains fresh or old blood you should contact your GP or your local Emergency Department.

Infection

If your child develops a cough or a cold and feels warm it is possible they may have an infection. Contact your GP within 24 hours as treatment may be necessary.

Voice changes

Your child’s voice may appear more nasal or high pitched for up to 6 weeks but should return to normal.

ANY MEDICAL CONCERNS CONTACT:

  • Your GP or NHS 111
  • Go to your Emergency Department

Ref: 10/21/32

Review: 10/23